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Tips to Solve Facts, Inference and Judgment Questions for Law Entrances

Logical Reasoning for Law Entrances

Facts, Inference and Judgment questions evaluate your ability to discern between factual information, logical inferences and subjective judgments. These questions are commonly found in competitive exams, including law entrance tests. In this guide, we’ll delve into effective strategies for solving Facts, Inference and Judgment questions and provide examples to illustrate each approach.

Understanding Facts, Inference and Judgment

  • Facts: Facts are objective statements that can be verified and proven true or false based on evidence. They are concrete and non-negotiable.
  • Inferences: Inferences are logical conclusions drawn from given facts. They involve deriving new information by applying reasoning to the provided facts.
  • Judgments: Judgments are subjective opinions or evaluations based on personal beliefs, values or interpretations. They reflect an individual’s viewpoint.

Strategies for Solving Facts, Inference and Judgment Questions

  • Read Thoroughly: Begin by reading the passage or statement carefully. Understand the information provided and the context in which it is presented.
  • Distinguish Facts: Identify statements that present objective, verifiable information. These are the facts upon which you will base your inferences and judgments.
  • Identify Inferences: Analyse the facts and logically deduce conclusions that can be drawn from them. Inferences must be supported by the given information.
  • Spot Judgments: Identify statements that express subjective opinions, evaluations or personal viewpoints. These are the judgmental elements.
  • Evaluate Validity: Assess the validity of inferences based on their logical connection to the facts. Determine if the inferences logically follow from the information provided.
  • Question Assumptions: Consider any implicit assumptions that may affect the validity of inferences. Assumptions are unstated premises that can impact the logical flow.
  • Check Objectivity: Assess whether judgments are based on facts and objective reasoning or if they rely heavily on personal beliefs or values.

Practice with Examples

Let’s apply these strategies to a couple of examples:

Example 1 – Facts and Inference:

  • Statement: “The weather forecast predicts heavy rain in the region.”
  • Inference: “People should carry umbrellas when they go out.”

Strategy Application:

  • Fact: The weather forecast predicts heavy rain.
  • Inference: People should carry umbrellas when they go out, as heavy rain is expected.

Example 2 – Facts and Judgment:

  • Statement: “The restaurant has received five-star reviews from multiple food critics.”
  • Judgment: “The restaurant offers the best dining experience in the city.”

Strategy Application:

  • Fact: The restaurant has received five-star reviews from food critics.
  • Judgment: The statement expresses a subjective opinion about the restaurant’s dining experience, which is not necessarily supported by the facts.

Example 3 – Inference and Judgment:

  • Statement: “The company reported a 20% increase in profits this quarter.”
  • Inference: “The company’s new marketing strategy has been successful.”
  • Judgment: “The company’s profits will continue to rise in the next quarter.”

Strategy Application:

  • Fact: The company reported a 20% increase in profits.
  • Inference: The company’s new marketing strategy may have contributed to the profit increase.
  • Judgment: The statement expresses a subjective opinion about future profits, which goes beyond the given facts.

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